fbpx

This Butterfly We Tried to Anaesthetize

curated by Sonny hall
This Butterfly We Tried to Anaesthetize

Leading up to the moment where this show found its devoted plate to be plated on, to be starkly admired from and then savagely and honestly digested off of. I found myself obsessing violently about my kitchen and the fact it needed a large refurbishment. I had arrived at the problem. A problem that began in my head and then frighteningly composed a rather fruitful and telling existence, outside of me. In the cold water, in the silence of the kitchen gas, in the breeze that thrusted through my cracked kitchen windows, in the exact and cutting motion of my knife each morning when illustrating the onions, peppers and tomatoes that compliment my morning’s signature dish, in the obsessive compulsive disorder that graces me with such an enchanted and confident sequence to pleasantly manipulate each agonizing moment of each tempestuous day, in the absolute flux, in the non-transferable feeling that is naked and invisible and sits with me for breakfast every morning, uninvited. In a swirl of dread, In a trickle of contentment, in all that typifies one sensation in one vessel, that is me. And with that, in the world that I greet to leave, each day. Only to meet again in the next moment. This problem gave life to me, in a moment of delusional racketeering of self. Then to others, then to self, then others again. All divided, well portioned, liquidized, in a huge bowl I found in my kitchen. I owned and developed a mixture that I became and controlled all at once. I stirred it while being stirred, spat in, admired, crucified, mixed with love then hate then love, again. Whipped into a ghastly awareness, full of true sentient. 

By using any other technique or being in any other place with any less or more compulsive compression laid out into my heart and spirit, would have only been true to what I could not have handed to myself, misplacing the heart of the problem, misplacing my very actuality. 

The procedure meant everything. And we all know every procedure exercised within the principles of truth will always display complications. The complications and trials of my problem’s responsibility was where the true and shiny spectacles breathed unapologetically. Calling for nothing but a bamboozled being to the issued line of action. This is where the procedure’s potential held its definition in shimmer and shadow. This is where the butterfly rids the chrysalis, where crystalized triumph and disastrous potential are all catered for, by a confident sequence that is sprinkled then fueled by precise tampering. 

This sequence came with truth and nothing else. The probable outcome of the untangling of this muddle made it’s intentions known, initially in the swelling of my bowels. It was in this moment, when I truly gauged the scope for loss of self and dramatic discovery and my grand opportunity to germinate my world, healthily in one combustible instant. This instant came as a daggering feeling of unrest. A feeling that brang notice to the fact I was carrying all the earth’s soil in my stomach, as if I had swallowed my own mixture, as if I had eaten every matter in my kitchen’s interior while neglecting the food in the fridge, as if I had become too excited for life and dread ridden all at once. When noticing this, that is when I discovered the gas leak in my kitchen. The problem was established.  Like any grand discovery, soon after, I found myself in the hornet’s nest, my senses and my reasoning absolutely covered by a significant uncovering.  Uncoiling it from it’s true nucleus. The problem that became my mission transgressed into a defeat and a victory all at once. There and then came the queen’s succulent honey. Then the stings. Then the bayonetting stings. Then the sweetness and so forth.

This personal experience made me think of the process one has to bear in order to seek out the formidable all defining answers. The real notation that I took from this and swallowed up wholly, like a prescription from my chemist, was that no answer can solely be defined. And that the counterparts and intricacies within the labyrinth of the core problem are the true noteworthy contributors to the entire message and the entire answer you are looking to receive. But by receiving it and putting it in your pocket and thinking you have the real solution to your problem would be absolute insanity. It would be like licking a fool’s achilles heel in hope for enlightenment. You would never do such a thing. In order to reap the advantages of possessing an answer you have to look far into the rectum before cleaning it. You have to look in the places of dishevelment, in a single flower’s full development, in the unpolished conditions that actual flare can naturally exist, in confusion, in the source of understanding and the origin of vacancy. Only then, can you start to expect to understand the problem. Then the answer. Then you can unwrap the present and receive the miniscule diamonds that are embedded in the spine of the fight for understanding.

This sinuous and sacrificial process exists in each artist that I chose for this show. In choosing everyone, I knew the selection of artists had to be people I knew in some way intimately and truthfully. I knew that everyone involved had to conduct themselves through continual honourings of veracity to self and then the world. Their work being the aftermath of their discoverings and impulses. This mob of humans know of a personalized methodical countermeasure to the human condition in many designs, silhouettes and abrasions. By probing then laying out such a category, I was able to form a faith in a disjointed but natural unity that these artists greatly symbolize. Unified in their discrete solitary missions as creators and instigators of expression and fine utterings and unified together in the framework of each other’s shared values and blended obversitys that only interest the gamut of truth and it’s herculean abilities. This is the bonding answer to my dislocated problem. 

Alexander James

Jack Laver

Adrian Schachter

Aidan Wallace

Bella Newman

Nicole Della Costa

Georgie Sommerville

Kesewa Aboah

Machine Operated

What draws you to an artist?

When they want to communicate in a proper way. Proper, being; honest and unapologetic. I want to feel and see why they are taking action in offering a gesture of expression .... Desperation, really and truly.

AucArt Selections

The selection of artists I have chosen are all people I appreciate in their character as well as their works. I feel as if there is a parallel with each artist, in how their work complements their character and vice versa. This is important to me because it outlines a truthful act in the heart of their output. 

The show is all about truth and where truth comes from, the need to harbour it correctly and the ways to go about doing so. It is a boundless expedition for each and every human. And with this I find connecting to each other on this basis is the utmost important way to go. Yet action has to be made to arrive at this ultimatum

 But in my eyes I could never establish this practice, if you like, to be entirely and ultimately ultimate, ever. It is a constant back and forth, between finding truth, owning it and showing it. The bottom line is communication and I thought by choosing these artists it would bring about the perfect mixture of declarations and confessions of real feelings, that can be communicated in whatever way the artist chooses to, truthful to each individual. 

 

1993, uk

Triple Vision, 2020

42 x 30 cm

Acrylic on paper

Facetime Unavailable, 2020

42 x 30 cm

Acrylic on paper

Sweet Revenge, 2020

42 x 30 cm

Acrylic on paper

Alexander James patches elements of the past, the present and the pre-empted future through his practice. His works look to reflectively tell a story about time, manifesting characters and scenarios triggered from childhood memories, projecting facets of past encounters into present existence. Acting as a diary for the audience, Alexander attempts to showcase works on paper documenting his experiences or thoughts, which are later combined and expanded to create the wider narrative, weaving between mediums of digital collage, paint and fabrics. Alexander lives and works in London, UK.

1998, uk

Caves, 2020

42 x 60 cm

Mixed media on paper mounted on wood canvas

Aerial View, 2020

60 x 84 cm

Mixed media on paper mounted on canvas

Trodden Path, 2020

42 x 60 cm

Mixed media on paper mounted on canvas

Broken Fences, 2020

42 x 60 cm

Mixed media on paper mounted on canvas

Osseus, 2020

42 x 60 cm

Mono-print on paper

Stages of Silence, 2020

61 x 91 cm

Acrylic on canvas

Ghosts That Were Given, 2020

40 x 60 cm

Oil and acrylic on canvas

Tired Armour, 2020

40 x 60 cm

Acrylic on canvas

Jack Laver is an artist and musician, whose practice often works within printmaking and painting. Jack explores the fringes of these mediums, creating experimental works that utilise techniques commonly perceived as errors to create images. His work communicates an obscured view of the world that we live in, adapting everyday scenes and objects to make strange of the mundane. Jack lives and works in London, UK.

1996, spain

Untitled, 2020

10 x 14 cm

Pen on paper

Untitled, 2020

122 x 153 cm

Oil pastel on paper

Spoonfed, 2020

42 x 59.4 cm

Pastel and coloured pencils on paper

Lamentation After Giotto, 2020

29 x 42 cm

Oil pastels on paper

Throughout art school, Adrian Schachter was taught to question everything. Not to accept anything as given. As a result, Adrian’s developed a kind of idealistic cynicism, moving him to analyze all that he encounters, searching out hypocrisies and inconsistencies. When applied to the world of images, Adrian was bombarded with an online presence since childhood, along with the rest of his generation. There was an appetite for digesting data in every form that was nothing less than voracious. Yet, the more diverse and psychologically charged the information was, the more Adrian became increasingly numbed and detached. While trying to elaborate this though his practice, Adrian found that pairing disparate but somehow tangentially related imagery created unintended relationships more profound and unexpected than when they existed on their own. In the process of mining for content that gets translated into his paintings, Adrian teases out and highlights connections that transform the way the viewer perceives the underlying material, creating new and unforeseen narratives in the process. Adrian lives and works in London, UK.

1994, usa

TMIHNFM_SF1_G, 2020

41 x 51 cm

Oil, archival paper, and tape on canvas

CHRONOTOPE_27, 2020

100 x 100 cm

Oil, house paint, and carbon copy on canvas

UNTITLED_IMPRESSION_1, 2020

110 x 100 cm

Acrylic, ink, and archived sand paper on linen

ASFXMAFE, 2020

60 x 70 cm

Oil, charcoal, resin, silver pigment on fish glue reversed canvas

ISAFBYMN_7, 2020

41 x 51 cm

Oil, charcoal, resin, silver pigment on fish glue reversed canvas

IALLT.35, 2020

70 x 70 cm

Thread, rope, acrylic and house paint on wool

EMBRYNCEMBERS, 2020

55 x 75 cm

Thread, rope, acrylic, and house paint on wool

TRETTLOTHTMS_LEAD_3_R, 2020

30 x 24 cm

Expired elastomeric paint with polymer medium, ink, and archival paper on canvas
 

Aidan Wallace is an American artist currently based in Europe who works in a large variety of media including primarily painting, collage, sculpture, and performance. Often his work can be seen as an accumulation and collision of these techniques and materials. The objective, and underlying approach, is firstly to attempt at eradicating assurance with the material and perceivable composition. His work is in constant pursuit of an unattainable order through an alchemical process and relationship to surface. This transgressive nature allows the expression of the artwork-as-experiment to enter a realm of textural confrontation with any preconceived understanding of the codical qualities found within. Aidan lives and works in Berlin, Germany.

1999, uSA

Enderman and Her Cousin Kitty – Journal Page Diptych, 2020

25.5 x 18 cm

Inkjet and watercolour on paper

My Mom is the Only Person in this World, 2017

25.5 x 18 cm

Inkjet and watercolour on paper

My Friend Like a Petal, 2020

25.5 x 18 cm

Inkjet and watercolour on paper

Louise is not Afraid of Anything, 2020

25.5 x 18 cm

Inkjet and watercolour on paper

Mohair Dewdrop Bonnet, 2020

122 x 153 cm

Crocheted lace weight 100% mohair

Bella Newman is an American visual artists whose practice comes from a desire to position herself on the boundaries of reality. Her works reflect ideas of other realms, surrounded by mystical beings and folkloric entities, manifested through a fixation on nature and the human condition. Through film and photography, Bella combines the use of literature and imagery to recontextualize observations of a deepened story. She is influenced by her upbringing in a rural suburban town in, depicting the years where her artistic practice had developed a sense of “selfhood” conjured throughout her works. Bella lives and works in Pennsylvania, USA.

1992, brazil

Funky, 2020

22 x 28 cm

Ink and Pigment in Silica Flat on paper

Conduct, 2020

22 x 28 cm

Ink and Pigment in Silica Flat on paper

Squeeze, 2020

22 x 28 cm

Ink and Pigment in Silica Flat on paper

Wired Heart I, 2020

22 x 28 cm

Mixed media on paper

Wired Heart II, 2020

22 x 28 cm

Mixed media on paper

A Charm, A Single Charm Is Doubtful, 2017

76 x 102 cm

Acrylic on canvas

A Charm, A Single Charm Is Doubtful, 2017

122 x 122 cm

Acrylic on canvas

A Charm, A Single Charm Is Doubtful, 2017

102 x 152 cm

Acrylic on canvas

Nicole Della Costa, is an artist and poet born in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. She works primarily in video, painting and poetry. Nicole has published two poetry collections and is releasing her next book As Serious as a Hiccup published by Pois é in Spring. 

Trafalgar Square, 2020

102 x 102 cm

Oil on canvas

Three Women With Parcels, 2020

41 x 41 cm

Oil on canvas

Untitled, 2020

41 x 41 cm

Oil on canvas

Untitled, 2020

76 x 76 cm

Oil and acrylic on canvas

Untitled, 2020

76 x 76 cm

Oil pastel on canvas

Venus in Boots, 2020

152.5 x 76 cm

Oil pastel on canvas

Untitled, 2020

76 x 61 cm

Oil pastel on canvas

Dogfight, 2020

102 x 76 cm

Oil on canvas

A Good Idea, 2020

122 x 91.5 cm

Oil pastel on canvas

Georgie Sommerville looks into the fluidity of moving image and the idea of storytelling through her artistic practice. Through taking early 20th century photographs of the East End, Georgie juxtaposes imageries through bright colours and bold line, creating abstract shape through silhouettes and shadow. Georgie scrapes away the oil off of the canvas, revealing the earliest marks and simplest forms. Instead of giving these figures an obvious identity, she focuses on silhouettes and shadows where faces and landscapes blend together. Georgie lives and works in London, UK.

1994, uk

Waterworks 1, 2020

103 x 67 cm

Dry pigment and pouring medium on paper

Waterworks 2, 2020

103 x 67 cm

Dry pigment and pouring medium on paper

Waterworks 3, 2020

103 x 67 cm

Dry pigment and pouring medium on paper

Waterworks 4, 2020

103 x 67 cm

Dry pigment and pouring medium on paper

Kesewa Aboah is a Ghanaian British artist based in London. She completed a BA in fine arts at the School of Visual Arts, New York in 2017. Following her move back to the UK after the completion of her studies Aboah has taken part in artist residency programs in Mexico City, Iceland and Kenya. Kesewa’s practice has a heavy focus on process; modernizing traditional techniques of embroidery and body imprinting to create a bold, colorful and sometimes haunting version of the 20th century tapestry. Her unconventional use of thread and paper relinquishes her control of the way in which the bodies take form. Allowing each work a personal narrative in both physicality and concept. Hours of untamed precision distorts her figures, realigns their limbs, rebirths their body, leaving a fragmented tribute to what once was. Kesewa lives and works in London, UK.

1997, uk

Incandecent, 2020

20 x 20 cm

Photographic negatives

B22, 2020

25.5 x 30.5 cm

Photography with hand-written text

E27, 2020

25.5 x 30.5 cm

Photography with hand-written text

GU10, 2020

25.5 x 30.5 cm

Photography with hand-written text

Machine Operated is a creative partnership between visual artists Josh Hercules and Nathan Taylor. Josh and Nathan live and work in London, UK.

Share

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin